Boxing
 
        === Crystal Ballin' in 2014: Forecasting the New Year's Best ===
 
 By Lyle Fitzsimmons, Boxing Editor
 
 (SportsNetwork.com) - Welcome back, my friends, to the show that never ends.
 
 I'm so glad you could attend. Come inside, come inside.
 
 With kudos to Emerson, Lake and Palmer, whose lyrics I've unapologetically co-
 opted to begin this week's piece, I thank you for arriving to this, the annual
 crystal ball forecast column for the year that's just gotten under way.
 
 As last year's installment at this time showed, looking forward 12 months in
 boxing is, at best, an inexact science.
 
 Unlike football, baseball or their collective ilk, there are no master
 schedules from which to pluck events to predict. And even if I was prescient
 enough to know now which fights would be made between which guys, say, next
 October, there's always a chance that three people sitting on the ring's
 perimeter would pound my forecasting into dust with their definition of what
 constitutes a "boxing lesson."
 
 But those are excuses and gripes for another day. Today is a day of forward
 thinking, and with that, here are the advance story recaps that other boxing
 scribes will be writing about 12 months from now.
 
 
 COMEBACK OF THE YEAR: Victor Ortiz
 
 He's got a ways to go before he reaches the number of final write-offs and
 sudden returns of fellow 140-147 pound veteran Zab Judah, but "Vicious Vic's"
 2014 nonetheless will feature his second rally from what many had prematurely
 determined was a career-ending defeat.
 
 Last seen retiring in his corner thanks to a broken jaw inflicted by behind-
 on-the-scorecards foe Josesito Lopez in June 2012, Ortiz spent his time away
 both healing and rebuilding his brand, as evidenced by a multi-week stay on
 ABC's Dancing With the Stars competition.
 
 He reappeared with a workmanlike 10-round pounding of faded ex-welterweight
 claimant Luis Collazo and got back into the title-bearing fraternity with a
 defeat of Carlos Molina on Floyd Mayweather Jr.'s Showtime PPV undercard in
 September. Thanks to that win, he's got a 2015 PPV date of his own on the
 horizon with another of "Money's" past victims, Canelo Alvarez.
 
 
 UPSET OF THE YEAR: Timothy Bradley-Manny Pacquiao II
 
 Though the result was the same in terms of whose hand was ultimately raised,
 far more people -- fans, media and moderately interested passers-by -- will be
 convinced that this time the official verdict actually corresponded to what
 went on in the ring.
 
 A 3-to-1 underdog when the two met in 2012, Bradley raised his welterweight
 street cred in the interim with defeats of Ruslan Provodnikov and Juan Manuel
 Marquez, while Pacquiao was KO'd by the latter and didn't fight for 11 months
 before returning for a glorified heavy-bag session with Brandon Rios.
 
 Faced with Pacquiao a second time in March, the man billed as "Desert Storm"
 showed the same skills that befuddled Marquez in their match, using quick feet
 to keep Manny out of sync and handling the former seven-division champion's
 best punches with aplomb en route to three scores of 116-112.
 
 
 KNOCKOUT OF THE YEAR: Floyd Mayweather Jr.-Marcos Maidana
 
 The rugged Maidana reached the Mayweather radar thanks to his surprise
 whipping of wannabe "Money" man Adrien Broner, but by the time his September
 audience with the consensus pound-for-pound elitist was through in Las Vegas,
 he might have wished he'd remained anonymous.
 
 Unlike Broner, who was clearly rattled by Maidana's aggression and punching
 prowess, Mayweather emerged from the first handful of rounds with a scrape
 under his right eye -- thanks to persistent rough stuff on the inside -- but
 with no significant damage inflicted on his jaw.
 
 His precision became the rule of the day as the fight evolved, and the left
 hook/straight right pairing that dropped a bloody Maidana for the 10-count in
 round 10 was at least somewhat reminiscent of the same combo Mayweather had
 used to finish an unsuspecting Victor Ortiz three years earlier.
 
 
 FIGHT OF THE YEAR: Abner Mares-Jhonny Gonzalez II
 
 The first one had the makings of a slugfest going in. But rather than a fight
 of the year, that Aug. 24 encounter in suburban Los Angeles instead turned
 into an upset of the year candidate courtesy of Gonzalez's precisely placed
 left hook that cracked the right side of Mares' previously unconquered jaw.
 
 The second go-round in L.A. will possess additional intrigue thanks to the
 first result and deliver belatedly on the initial excitement promise with
 multiple rounds of intense action before Mares -- who was again dropped, but
 this time able to continue -- gradually began landing his own impactful shots.
 
 The unyielding body work in the early rounds paid dividends by incrementally
 removing the starch from the older Gonzalez's punches and leaving him
 stationary and defenseless target by the time it was waved off at 2:12 of the
 10th round.
 
 
 FIGHTER OF THE YEAR: Floyd Mayweather Jr.
 
 He was last honored by the BWAA in 2007. A few, including my former
 TigerBoxing.com colleague Kevin Iole, insisted he was the obvious choice for
 2013's award. But by the time 2014 grounds to a close, few had credible
 arguments that Mayweather did have the year's best year.
 
 Back on the two-fight schedule that he'd returned to in 2013, Mayweather
 opened with a 12-round defeat of game Englishman Amir Khan in a May bout far
 more competitive and compelling than many anticipated, ultimately winning by
 scores of 116-111, 116-111 and 115-112 on the official cards.
 
 The award was cemented in his nightcap performance four months later, however,
 when he dispatched WBA champion Marcos Maidana in the 10th round of a bout
 that provided him his first non-controversial stoppage since a demolition of
 Ricky Hatton (also in 10 rounds) in 2007.
 
 * * * * * * * * * *
 
 This week's title-fight schedule:
 
 No fights scheduled.
 
 Last week's picks: 1-0
 2014 picks record: 1-0 (100 percent)
 Overall picks record: 549-194 (73.9 percent)
 
 NOTE: Fights previewed are only those involving a sanctioning body's full-
 fledged title-holder -- no interim, diamond, silver, etc. Fights for WBA
 "world championships" are only included if no "super champion" exists in the
 weight class.
 
 Lyle Fitzsimmons is a veteran sports columnist who's written professionally
 since 1988 and covered boxing since 1995. His work is published in print and
 posted online for clients in North America and Europe. Reach him at
 fitzbitz@msn.com or follow him on Twitter: @fitzbitz.
 
 
 01/06 13:53:03 ET

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